• Pet Obedience Training - Most Typical Mistakes While Training Your Dog

  • von: JillianLei hinzugefuegt: 05-05-22
  • When I got my Border Collie mix Sam from the local Humane Society, he had very few problems, which is a godsend for a rescued dog. In fact, when I inquired about Sam through a phone call, the people at the Humane Society said he was basically the perfect dog. They informed me that the only problem he had was jumping up on people. I thought, "that will be easy to solve".

    If the why does my dog bark at other dogs won't crate or leash willingly and you're out of time, you will need to corner him. In a small area, this is easily accomplished; just be sure to maintain NON-THREATENING body language the entire time. For example: don't look directly at him, approach sideways, move slowly and calmly. Don't reach over his head, other than to gently drape a blanket or towel over it...if he can't see you, it can have a calming effect, and the towel also makes it much harder for him to deliver a fear bite. It is very important to read up on, and fully understand, canine body language and calming signals before ever attempting to corner a fearful dog pulling on leash (www.afribuddies.com blog article) (or any dog, really).

    Instinct behaviour is also an important cause of barking. Some dogs still demonstrate normal canine pack behaviour and barking is a form of communication and to display territory. Breeds such as Siberian Huskies, Alaskan Malamutes, German Shepherd Dogs and dogs crossed with wolves seem to be more prone to this type of barking.

    It is also imperative that you be consistent and persistent in your dog obedience training. Most of the time your dog will not change their behavior in a single day. If you stay consistent the way you are training them and be sure not to give up, your dog will learn what you are teaching them, it can just take time. It is important not to give up on them if they haven't made any progress after just one day. If you keep your eye on the prize and work with them, all of your hard work will pay off.

    Once I gave the treats, I ignored the dogs, or they would hound me for more treats, and eventually they would come to me, get their treat, and gradually wander back to their previous activities of grazing, searching for non-existent rabbits, etc. Then I stepped up the training. Calling the dogs to me in the middle of the back yard is one thing, but having them all race to me at the back door is entirely different. Calling from the back door means that they might have to come inside the house, and inside means no wrestling, barking, and acting like crazy dogs. Outside is far more fun on a sunny day!

    Over time, you will progress to getting him to DO things, in order to drive you to give him treats. A dog can be trained without ever having to be touched! Simply wait for a behaviour to be offered, perhaps a play-bow or a Sit, or eventually a bump of your treat-filled hand with his nose. Then say "YES!" enthusiastically the instant it happens (or use a clicker to mark it) and toss a great treat...or a piece of his dinner. You can then pair a command to the action, and start to ask the dog to perform it in order to get the treat. I've had rescue reactive dogs I couldn't walk up and touch, who would Sit, Gimme Five, or otherwise interact with me in order to solicit a treat. This is *two way communication*, and it's important. Even coming up close to ask for food can be a triumph for a fearful dog.

    Other opportunities available for going to a training class is that your instructor can correct problems that he can see you make. Without an instructor around, it will may take longer to realize you are even making a mistake.

    Moving objects such as cats, squirrels and kids on bikes are harder. Try them only when your dogs' behavior is consistent. If it's not working then you've simply gone too far too fast. Just back up a bit and try again.

    The scene in a dog obedience school is just like life. In life there is a lot of noise, so much things going on, etc. In these classrooms there is a lot of noise to show them that they must learn no matter what the scenario is. It really teaches them to concentrate fully, and since they have been taught all aspects of obedience in this type of situation then they will definitely become well trained.

    Dog obedience training could be easy when you will follow these easy yet effective ways. But then again, this is not an activity that your dog is the only player because this should be you and your dog. It takes love, respect and passion for you to be successful in this dog obedience training.

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